How To Do The 505 Agility Test

How To Do The 505 Agility Test

The 505 agility test is a physical test used to measure the agility and 180-degree turning ability of an athlete.

In general, the 505 agility test is beneficial for athletes who run in competitive events that involve shuttles or athletes who compete in sports that involve a lot of physical turning, such as basketball, football, tennis, baseball, etc.

The 505 agility test involves little to no professional equipment and only requires an open space where the athlete can run in a straight direction for a total of 15 meters.

If you want to know about the 505 agility test or want to conduct the test yourself, this guide will explain what the agility test is, the benefits, equipment and factors involved, as well as a simple step-by-step guide on how to do the test.

What Is The 505 Agility Test?

The 505 agility test is a test of physical agility and 180-degree turning ability in a distanced capacity, measuring the total speed in seconds to determine the results.

The 505 agility test involves a total distance of 15-meters with three marked points, using cones or visible markers. These are the starting line (point A), the timing point at 10 meters (point B), and the turning point at 15 meters (point C).

Point A is where the athlete positions themselves and starts the rest. Point B is where the stopwatch is activated. Point C is where the athlete turns 180 degrees, before crossing point B for a second time, at which the stopwatch is stopped.

Due to this, the result is the time taken for the athlete to pass point B, turn 180 degrees at point C, and then pass point B a second time, which concludes the test.

Test Factors To Consider

As with any physical test, there are factors to take into consideration that may affect the performance of the athlete and the results they achieve. These are:

  • evenness and slipperiness of the running surface
  • weather conditions
  • marker visibility 
  • running shoes and attire of the athlete
  • physical and emotional state of the athlete
  • prior nutrition and quality of sleep of the athlete before taking the test
  • whether or not an audience is present

Where possible, these factors should be improved and accounted for to achieve the best performance and the most accurate results for the 505 agility test.

How To Do The 505 Agility Test

Below, find everything you need to know to set up the 505 agility test and conduct it accurately.

The 505 agility test is possible to be performed solo, but it is best that an assistant is present to oversee the pressing of the stopwatch and the visible points at which the athlete crosses the markers and turns. This will improve the accuracy of the results.

Equipment Needed For The 505 Agility Test

To conduct the 505 agility test accurately, you will need:

  • A tape measure for accurately measuring distance
  • Cones to visibly indicate each distance 
  • A stopwatch for accurate timing 

Any kind of high-visibility marker can be used as an alternative to cones as long as both the athlete and assistant can see these clearly.

A handheld stopwatch is also not required; a stopwatch app on a mobile device or any means of accurately measuring time (in milliseconds) can be used instead.

Setting Up The 505 Agility Test

To set up the 505 agility test, you will first need to measure out the three main “points” of the test. The total distance is 15 meters.

The first point (point A) is where the athlete positions themselves to begin the test. The second point (point B) is at 10 meters from point A. The final point is at 15 meters from point A (or 5 meters from point B).

As you measure these out, make sure to place cones or markers on either side in a parallel setup, so that the athlete will not run into them. Vanishing spray may also be used to create a line for greater visibility and accuracy.

For optimal athlete performance and results, it is best to set up the 505 agility test on flat running ground that is not slippery in any way.

Conducting The 505 Agility Test

Once you have set up the 505 agility test and the athlete is ready to begin, this is how to conduct the 505 agility test in 5 simple steps.

  1. Have the athlete place themselves at the starting line (point A) in a standing position with one foot on the line.
  2. When the athlete is ready, signal for them to begin.
  3. Activate the stopwatch as the athlete passes through point B.
  4. Monitor the athlete so that they touch point C with both feet (or with their hand, depending on preference) before turning 180 degrees.
  5. Stop the stopwatch as the athlete passes through point B for the second time.

The time displayed on the stopwatch in seconds and milliseconds is the athlete’s result of the 505 agility test.

Since the 505 agility test is a short exercise, the test can be repeated multiple times after sufficient resting periods to achieve better/accurate results or an overall average from the collected data.

What Are The Benefits Of The 505 Agility Test?

The 505 agility test measures an athlete’s agility and 180-degree turning ability in time, but it can also be used to evaluate performance, track progress, and improve results over a given time period.

For athletes who perform shuttle runs or compete in sports that involve lots of turning, such as tennis, basketball, football, or baseball, the 505 agility test can help to improve agility and turning speed.

Overall, the 505 agility test improves 180-degree turning speed, cardiovascular endurance, agility and stamina, and explosive running power while strengthening all areas of the leg muscles (quads, hamstrings, and calves).

Conclusion

The 505 agility test is one of the most popular physical fitness tests for measuring — and improving — an athlete’s agility and 180-degree turning ability. It requires little to no professional equipment and can be carried out on any even running surface where the athlete can run a total of 15 meters.

To conduct the 505 agility test, you will need a tape measure, cones or markers, and a stopwatch (or any tool or app that accurately measures in milliseconds). The test can be conducted multiple times and on a regular schedule to track progress and improve results over time.

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