Posted on

How To Improve Hand Grip Strength

How To Improve Hand Grip Strength

Grip strength is important for everyday activities and is essential for many sports especially those such as water skiing, climbing to name a few, and my favourite, kayaking of course.

It is also part of the selection process for many of the service sectors such as the Police and Fire and Rescue Service but did you know that grip strength is also a key indicator of a healthy life for everyone?

There are some ways to improve grip strength but here is a simple one you can do at home at any time. All you need is a soft tennis ball, those free ones you sometimes get given as a gift made of foam are ideal; you know the stress ball types.

I’d say a tennis ball is a bit tough going unless you are already very strong, and then this doesn’t apply.

Rubber-ball squeeze workout to improve your grip strength

  • Grab the ball in the palm of your hand and squeeze it as firmly as you can
  • Hold this squeeze for 8 to 10 seconds then release
  • Repeat 5 – 10 times

This simple workout only takes a few minutes out of each day but could make a big difference to your health and wellness.

Over time, this short workout will become noticeably easier showing that your grip strength is improving.

Grip strength measurement tool to track progress

While you can improve strength and never need to measure your progress other than a feeling that your grip is improving, Takei a Japanese company produces a method of measurement known as a dynamometer.

The Takei grip strength dynamometer is used for professional sports teams and athletes but also as an early indicator of overall health and wellness and used across clinics and hospitals worldwide.

Some would say that hand grip strength doesn’t represent a person’s overall strength, but merely, with no surprise, their grip strength. However, a recent, study at the Medical Research Council Unit for Lifelong Health and Ageing at University College London, claimed that a good level of physical strength at the age of 53 was a real objective assessment of the risk of premature death.

Leave a Reply